Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
STATION
CSPAN 6
CSPAN2 4
MSNBCW 3
CNNW 2
WRC (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17
. u.n. secretary general hailed nelson mandela as a giant and a man of inspiration. he said he is profoundly saddened by his passing. >> nelson mandela was a giant for justice and a human inspiration. many around the world were greatly influenced by his self-less struggle for freedom. he touched our lives in deeply personal ways. at the same time, no one did more in our time to advance the values and aspirations of the united nations. >> let's go to the live desk now. pat lawson muse with reaction from former president bill clinton. pat? >> yes, former president clinton says he's lost a true friend today. also, he says, quote, history will remember nelson mandela as a champion of dignity and f freedom. we will remember him as a man of grace and compassion for whom abandoning bitterness and embracing adversaries. back to you. >> thanks so much. we'll have continuing coverage, of course, and reaction of his death throughout the night and online at www.nbcwashington.com. we'll also have a full hour long special edition of "nightly news" following our broadcast. >>> now to other ne
madeleine albright, former secretary of state and u.s. ambassador to the u.n. dr. albright. [applause] >> sandy berger former national security advisor to president clinton. sandy. [applause] >> leon fuerth, former national security advisor to vice president gore. [applause] >> nancy soderberg, former deputy national security advisor to president clinton. [applause] >> and general wesley clark, former supreme allied commander europe and director of strategic plans and policy for the joint chiefs of staff. general clark. [applause] >> i would also like to recognize the director of the clinton library. thank you. [applause] >> joseph, the director of the cia information management services. [applause] >> skip rutherford, the dean of the clinton school of public service. [applause] >> bruce lindsey, the chairman of the board of the clinton foundation. [applause] >> forward slash future of transportation rodney slater. [applause] >> and governor jim guy tucker. [applause] >> it is now my pleasure to introduce dr. john gannon. dr. gannon served as the deputy director for intelligence at th
the national institute of health, michelle from u.n. aids, debra carrying on the great work of our acting global aids coordinator and our many friends from the philanthropic world including bill gates. thank you for joining us here today. now, every year this is a moment to reflect on how far we've come since the early days of the aids epidemic. those of you who lived through it remember all too well the fear and stigma and how hard people with hiv had to fight to be seen or heard or treated with basic compassion. do you remember how little we knew about how to prevent aids or treat them. what we did know was the devastation it inflicted, striking down vibrant men and women in the prime of their lives and spreading from city to city and country to country seemingly overnight. today that picture is transformed. thanks to the courage and love of so many of you in this room and around the world, awareness has soared, research has surged, prevention, treatment and care are now saving millions of lives not only in the world's richest countries but in some of the world's poorest countries as we
2011. a u.n. fact finding team has found what it calls massive evidence that the highest levels of the syrian government are responsible for war crimes, and crimes against humanity. >> the u.n. report also blames the rebels for committing war crimes. and they point to the fact that the majority of syrian victims have been killed and wounded by conventional weapons and not chemical ones. >> to finds out how you can help those affected by this civil war, check out cnn.com/impact your world. >> let's turn to russia now where moscow's bolshoi ballet has long represented grace and culture but a horrific attack happened that sounds more like a tragic play and the drama that's played out more like an opera than ballet. a dancer and two others charged with throwing acid in the face of the bolshoi's artistic director. sergei filin. now as atika schubert reports those attackers just found out how much time they're going to serve. >> this is the home of the world famous bowl shoil ballet company and the scene for numerous allegations of corruption and scandal that will unfolded over the co
from the national institute of health, and michelle from u.n. aids, and debra who is carrying on the great work as the acting global aids coordinator and many friends from the philanthropic world including bill gates, so, thank you, all, for joining us here today. every year, this is a moment to reflect on how far we've come since early days of the aids end epidemic, and those of you who lived through it remember all too well the fear and the stigma and how hard people with hiv had to fight to be heard or be treated with decent compassion. you remember how little we knew how to prevent aids or how it treat it. what we knew is the devastation inflected, striking down vibrant men and women in the time of their lives spreading to city to city, country to country seemingly overnight. today, that picture has transformed thanks to the courage and love of some of you in this room and around the world awareness soars, research surged, prevention, treatment, and care save millions of lives in the richest countries and the world's poorest countries as well. for many, with testing and ac
-term. i will say that was very positive. the u.n. as well use whatever shelter models of the cluster key model into the future. the u.n. is thought that time, particularly unicef and osha are particularly strong right out of the gate. i would just reiterate this type of the dvds. i would also say as he spoke about the misrepresentative green mentioned, you sound like we've been in the same areas in pakistan and tsunami penalties stiffer and emergencies emergencies a sitcom for that i think there's been a lot of learning that has gone on. frankly this nominee was the first time we really worked closely with the american military setting up temporary bridges to get to violence and locations that were completely transfigured as the geography had changed. in haiti as well, the military came up in the philippines. i know in haiti the u.s. military tried to do with a lighter footprint, with a letter president never going in providing assistance. in the philippines from a came in, there is joy for most of the people we talked to roll around. it is very, very impressive. even in the media outlet
inspectors from the u.n.'s nuclear watchdog toured the heavy water reactor at iraq. a sign that while there's plenty of scepticism some progress was already under way. robert, the president towed a careful line here. i thought his remarks were interesting. it seems like we're in the middle of what our good friend david axelrod likes to call kabuki theater, confident but not overconfident. i wonder about the deal back and forth between president obama and members of his own congress like bob menendez pushing this renewed sanctions deal. >> i do think you've got the potential collision of a lot of different time lines. the president, i think, is realistic to say there's a possibility of a deal but the deal can long move forward long-term if iranians are willing to do things. if he understands that from colliding time lines politically you've got congressional members from both parties pursuing sanctions. you've got israelis against this deal. i think the one important thing the president has in his pocket, so to speak, the american people are supportive of a deal because they are so incredibl
. in fact, tonight at the u.n. security council not far from where we are now, they are calling a moment of silence to remember and to honor him. he was the most incredible leader for our time, especially as we know, the possibility of violence, of division, of paralysis and partisanship, he really was able to overcome that and his long walk to freedom has benefited the whole world and how ironic it is that the film of his own biography is coming out right now. there are premieres right now, last week in the kennedy center in washington, tonight in london, where his own daughter has been, and there is so much now that is coming out for people to be able to read and to reflect and to pause and remember just what gift this amazing man gave to the world. i interviewed f.w. de clerk, who was his partner in the end and the dismantling of apartheid, one of the world's most violent racist regimes that endured for so long, a
. speaker, today marks the 1 u.n.th consecutive -- 100th consecutive legislative day the safe climate caucus has spoken on the house floor, calling for action to address climate change. the science itself is clear. climate change is already contributing to significant environmental changes. floods nted droughts, and hurricanes to name a few. but climate change is not only a serious environmental problem, it's a serious economic problem as well. american businesses, large and small, understand this threat. and they're responding accordingly. they're increasing their energy efficiencies, reducing pollution, and implementing more sustainable business practices. american businesses understand that the changing climate is already hurting their bottom lines. and they're taking action to strengthen their competitiveness and their resiliency. congress should be doing the same. yet our majority continues to stick its head in the sand and do nothing. climate change poses a real and immediate threat to our economy and we really can't afford to wait any longer. i urge my colleagues to join with america
to get a constructive soup -- discussion along the lines of the you and security -- u.n. security council resolutions. host: here is john from new york, republican line. caller: i would like to ask the guests about u.s. foreign-policy posture all over the world. it seems that the u.s. is leaving parts of the world to other actors such as russia in the middle east, and our allies around the world have less and less trust with u.s. to back them up in a situation where they get in trouble with one of these other actors like china is missing in defense identification zone that they're setting up. south korea and japan, for instance, had their airlines say that we will not respect that zone. the u.s. told airlines to respect that zone the u.s. all over the world where they back down, now they are backing down in china, and putin is trying to re-institute the soviet union. all over the world the u.s. is backing down in every situation. can you explain that please? guest: john, thank you for your question. i will talk about two things. i will talk about syria and then china. you raise two import
was a big part of it. at the same time the u.n. security council passed the first resolution in 1962, so it was a long walk to sanctions, not just a long walk to freedom. what is your take on why it took so long, given the overt racism in south africa to get to that point? >> well, as i just mentioned, why did it take us so long to get a voting bill passed under linden johnson? how could we a country of 200 or 300 years allowed slavery, jim crowe slavery to have persisted for so long? i think that's just another example of it that over time finally the morality and the ill morality of racism was able to be overcome. but it is not easy and i think many feelings are still there. you can see there is still a divide in our country. we still divide up red state, blue state. we have those fighting the civil war in many ways in their own minds, whether it's northern aggression or the interruption of a way of life in the south, et cetera. so i think it's a part of the human drama that we have to fight this evil of discrimination based on either race, ethnicity, religion, preference, any of the s
that the president has announced ignores not only u.s. law but ignores the u.n. sanctions that are in place. and it also ignores the fact that iran has not made any concessions in this area in the last 30 years. it also ignores the position that this deal puts israel in, one that is untenable and more impossible than any i have seen in my lifetime. the naivity of this administration in dealing with iran is something that is simply breathtaking. mr. speaker, i would just suggest to you that if iran gains nuclear weapons, we will need a new calendar. it will change our reality in the world that much. and i would say to you that while there's still time, we need to act. d you know, mr. speaker, there is that moment in the life of every problem when it is big enough to be seen and still small enough to be addressed but in terms of iran's nuclear weapons pursuit, that window is closing quickly. and whatever this body can do, whatever this president can do to prevent iran from gaining a nuclear weapons capability must be done soon because soon they will have the ability to ignore our treaties and
in the attack. november was a very violent month in iraq and hundreds were killed and the u.n. says there has been a surge in execution-style attacks. more than 8,000 people have been killed since the beginning of this year and in november alone more than 500 civilians and 100 security forces were killed. chance of any friend of america is a traitor and hundreds of protesters called for a stop to u.s. drone strikes and demonstrators burned a likeness of president obama and the protest was staged by the defense of pakistan council and alliance of religious and political parties. meanwhile vice president joe biden begins a delicate diplomatic mission today and due to arrive in japan hoping to ease tensions in the bitter dispute with china and we report. >> they look like an army, they even act like an army but they are not a real army. these troops are from japan's self-defense force on training exercise earlier this year. but under japan's constitution they can only fire to defend themselves. with japan's larger neighbor china asserting itself internationally questions are being asked whether
, the united states was then able to get the foundational u.n. security council resolutions that have been the premise for everything that has happened in the last seven 1/2 years. resolutions by the way at the beginning of 06, everyone told us we could not get. and are then the building framework for the global coalition is by the way an astonishing bipartisan diplomatic achievement. begun in 06. carried forward with great effect bit obama administration. this includes stuart levy at treasury and his successors with other officials at treasury. if you think about the global coalition, that has crippled the iranian economy, and the geopolitical significance of that coalition, and that that coalition has been created and has endured for seven 1/2 years to the, to reach to the present moment, that's an extraordinaire bipartisan accomplishment that i think has received very little notice and many of the critics today were the critics of the initial move in the spring of 06. it is worthwhile to remember how much bipartisan work and work by professional bureaucrats has been involved in erecting
majority leader cantor and hoyer on the u.n. legislative agenda. >> kentucky senator rand paul will be speaking at the detroit economic club friday to announce his new proposal on jobs and the economy. you can see a live starting at 12: 35 eastern here on c-span. and on c-span 3, former utah governor and presidential candidate jon huntsman and former indiana governor and senator evan bayh will talk about bipartisanship. live at 12: teen p.m. eastern. -- 12:15 p.m. eastern. >> things escalate so quickly. a moment that seemed so loving can just turn and flip and be so out of control. this is one of those days and it leavewith adam packing to and going through his things and finding a hidden handgun. he said i just want to take this and sell it if i want some money. on top of the other pressures, they have no money. just held the gun and he went in the room and came out with a shotgun and really tried to jam it at her. he wanted to get her go so much that she would pull the trigger and kill him. this is based on what she told me -- she wanted to. >> david hinkle follows a man sund
to the u.n. remediated the refusal to even recognize. this came a fortnight after the ruler of iran referred to israel as a rabid dog and to us as not worthy as being called human. he said we were doomed to failure and annihilation. november, he called and basn illegitimate tard regime. these remarks are more than a simple matter of sticks and stones. able again to discount rhetoric from rogue regime, from radical regimes. they say well, it is just talk. but talk has consequences. we have learned that in history. especially when the regime that make these statements have the capability to carry it out. the regime carries -- supplies thousands of rockets, rocket that are precision guided munitions letter increasingly lethal and deadly. this is a regime committed to our destruction. must be ane there unequivocal demand alongside the negotiations in geneva for change in iranian policies. this must be part and parcel of the negotiation. in other words, i am saying that what is required is not merely a munition of iran's capability to produce nuclear weapons but also a demand to change i
-- discussion along the lines of n.e you and security -- u. security council resolutions. host: here is john from new york, republican line. caller: i would like to ask the guests about u.s. foreign-policy posture all over the world. isseems that the u.s. leaving parts of the world to iner actors such as russia the middle east, and our allies around the world have less and u.s. to backth them up in a situation where they get in trouble with one of these other actors like china is missing in defense identification zone that they're setting up your to south korea and japan, for instance, had their airlines say that we will .ot respect that zone the u.s. told airlines to the u.s. allzone over the world where they back down, now they are backing down in china, and putin is trying to .e-institute the soviet union all over the world the u.s. is backing down in every situation. can you explain that please? guest: john, thank you for your question. i will talk about two things. i will talk about syria and then china. you raise to two important points. over the last year or so with syria, the assad r
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17